Dr. Sherry Ama Mawuko Johnson (DVM, ISCAH-Havana, MPhil, Ghana, PhD, Nairobi)

Position: 
Lecturer
Email Address: 
sajohnson@ug.edu.gh

Academic Qualifications

  • PhD - University of Nairobi, 2015
  • MPhil - University of Ghana, 2011
  • DVM - ISCAH, Havana, 1994
Professional Membership
  • Member, Ghana Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Alumni Association
  • Member, University Teachers Association of Ghana
  • Member, Ghana Veterinary Medical Association

Awards

  • Early Career Research Leader Fellowship – Postdoc Fellowship. Future Africa, University of Pretoria. Jan 2019 to date
  • The Fleming First Country Grant – Technical Lead (Field Training), Animal Health Team of the University of Ghana. Jan 2019 – June 2020
  • BANGA -AFRICA Project – April 2018-2019

Research Interest

One death to any disease passed on from animals to humans is one death too many and this has been the driver of my research interest. My research focus is on zoonoses; diseases transmissible from animals to humans, be it from companion animals or domestic livestock.

According to the US Centre for Disease Control, 6 out of every 10 known infectious diseases in people are spread from animals, and 3 out of every 4 new or emerging infectious diseases in people are spread from animals. Most of these diseases are preventable or better managed when much information is known about them in any geographic area. In this regard I have investigated the prevalence of Q fever in livestock, a disease that had previously not been studied in Ghana. I have evaluated Rabies surveillance systems in Ghana and identified gaps that have shaped up its control in the studied areas.

In the wake of COVID-19 pandemic, I am collaborating with other researchers from the University of Kent, UK, studying COVID-19 and Zoonoses in developing countries. It is hope that the outcome will provide preparedness guidelines for this and future pandemics.

 

Current Research

My current research is to investigate the prevalence of Rift Valley fever (RVF) in Ghana, a disease never reported in Ghana before, although it has been reported in countries bordering Ghana. Rift Valley fever causes abortions in livestock and fever-like symptoms in humans.  The outcome of this study will be useful in determining whether to make RVF part of the priority diseases in Ghana or not. This study is being sponsored by Future Africa, University of Pretoria through its post-doctoral fellowship on Early Career Research Leader Fellowship (ECRL).

I am also part of an Arthropod-borne Infectious Disease Surveillance Project. The project involves the collection of data on the prevalence and distribution of external parasites and vector borne infectious diseases of dogs and cats across six sub-Saharan African countries: Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Namibia, Tanzania and Uganda. It is sponsored by the African Small Animal Network (AFSCAN), of the World Small Animal Veterinary Association (WSAVA).

Past Research Projects

  1. Q fever in cattle, sheep and goats in Volta region of Ghana – 2017-2018, supported by the USDA
  2. Blood Lead and Mercury Concentrations in dogs in Kyebi, Ghana: A sentinel for heavy metal environmental pollution – 2018-2019. Funded by BANGA Africa Project
  3. Antimicrobial usage in poultry production in Ghana

Recent Publications

  1. Johnson S.A.M., Kaneene J.B., Asare-Dompreh K., Tasiame w., Mensah I.G., Afakye K., Simpson V.S., Addo K. (2019) Seroprevalence of Q fever in cattle, sheep and goats in Volta region of Ghana. Veterinary Medicine and Science 5 (3) pp. 402-411. https://doi.org/10.1002/vms3.160
  2. Tasiame, W., Johnson, S., Burimuah, V., Akyereko, E., El-Duah, P., Amemor, E., . . . Owiredu, E. (2020). Outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza in Ghana, 2015: Degree of losses and outcomes of time-course outbreak management. Epidemiology and Infection, 148, E45. doi:10.1017/S095026882000045X
  3. Johnson, S., Bugyei, K., Nortey P., Tasiame, W. Antimicrobial drug usage and poultry production: case study in Ghana. (2017) Animal Production Science – 59 (1) 177-182 https://doi.org/10.1071/AN16832
  4. Tasiame W., Johnson S., Burimuah V., Akyereko E., Amemor E. (2019). Dog population structure in Kumasi, Ghana: a missing link towards rabies control. Pan African Medical Journal 33 DOI: 10.11604/pamj.2019.33.13.18284
  5. Johnson, S.A.M., Gakuya, D.W., Mbuthia, P.G., Mande, J.D., Afakye, K., Maingi, N. (2016). Myiasis in Dogs in the Greater Accra Region of Ghana. Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, 16, 54-57
  6. Tasiame, W., Emikpe, O. Folitse, D., Fofie, C.O., Burimuah, V., Johnson, S., Awuni, A., Afari, E., Yebuah, N., Wurapa, F. (2016). The Prevalence of Brucellosis in Cattle and their Handlers in North Tongu District of Volta Region, Ghana. African Journal of Infectious Diseases. 10, 111 – 117
  7. Tasiame, W., Emikpe, B., Folitse, R.D., Fofie, C.O., Johnson, S., Burimuah, V., Atawalna, J., Boateng, E., Amemor, E. (2016). Foetal Wastage in Sheep and Goats at the Kumasi Abattoir in Ghana: A Cross Sectional Study. Archives of Basic and Applied Medicine. 4, 95 – 98
  8. Johnson S. A. M., Gakuya, D. W., Mbuthia, PG., Mande, J. D., Maingi, N. (2015). Prevalence of gastrointestinal helminths and management practices for dogs in the Greater Accra region of Ghana. Heliyon, e0002